Walking Holidays on the Sunshine Coast #13 – Kinnikinnick’s newest trail

 

Kinnikinnick Park

A new multi-purpose trail  project was officially opened at Kinnikinnick Park last week. Brown Sugar with 1.8 km of twists and turns was completed over the course of 5 years by successive classes from Capilano University’s Mountain Bike Operations Program.

Brown Sugar Trail at Kinnikinick Park

Kinnikinick is already one of my favourite walking areas so it seemed like a good excuse for a Saturday afternoon hike. One of the hallmarks of this trail system is excellent signage with approximate distances allowing you to choose just how far you want to walk that day.

Kinnikinnik Park

The student expertise that went into the building of Brown Sugar was evident with a few of these raised bridges for those wanting more of a technical challenge. This new trail also had banked corners for an easy ride, graded areas to keep the trail from washing away, and strategically placed obstacles to keep you from wandering off  the trail.  But the trail wasn’t built just for mountain bikers and I had it completely to myself as I explored on foot.

Eagles Nest Trail in Kinnikinnick

With a few stops for photography, it took me about a half-hour to explore this new addition and I followed Eagles Nest for my return route. This trail is aptly named as I could hear a pair of eagles overhead calling back and forth to each other.  At other times along the trail I could also hear the occasional tapping of woodpeckers and a healthy chorus of frogs.

Kinnickinnick Park

When the trails were first created a decade or more ago, they worked hard to leave the park in a very natural state and I think they succeeded. Today you can see the forest slowly reclaiming its territory. Fallen logs have taken on a verdant green coating with  small shoots of new vegetative growth poking through the moss.

Kinnikinnick ParkTall conifers, 10 feet or more in circumference, stretch upwards toward the sky, while the massive stumps of  trees from a bygone past stand silently, allowing us to imagine what this forest once was.

Kinnickinnick Park

As I walked through the park, passing over conveniently placed footbridges, the  sun shone through the trees, dappling the trail with patches of light and everything was as it should be. Life is good on the Sunshine Coast.

foot bridge - Kinnickinnick Park

A hearty thank you to the students of Capilano University’s Mountain biking Operations Program and to the original stewards of Kinnikinnick Park for creating such a wonderful set of trails. We are indeed very fortunate to live in such a beautiful place as the Sunshine Coast.

Follow this link to return to our website www.coraclecove.com

Posted in Walking Holidays on the Sunshine Coast | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Walking Holidays on the Sunshine Coast- #12 – the totem poles of the shíshálh

The shíshálh people have lived on the Sunshine Coast for several millennia benefiting from the rich resources of the sea and the rain-forest. Their wealth was enhanced through strategic marriages which fostered peace, goodwill and trade .  At the time of European contact their population exceeded 25,000.

Sechelt Village  c.1920

Unfortunately that relationship would prove to be costly as disease and misguided government policies brought this once proud nation to its knees. More recently the shíshálh have re-gained their economic independence and moved forward to rebuild their Nation. Their totems tell us a story of freedom and re-birth.

Screen Shot 2013-05-07 at 12.18.11 PM

In a tremendous cultural renaissance, almost 30 totems have been carved in the last thirty years. While contemporary, they are impressive indications of the rich cultural and artistic heritage of the shíshálh.

IMG_0088

Our tour begins at the Sechelt Indian Band Hall which is located behind McDonald’s. Leave your car in the parking lot and walk around to the front of the hall.

It is here that the talking totems begin their story…

On the water side of the Hall, a circle of smaller totems, carved by Jamie Jeffries surrounds a large granite bolder with a plaque describing the history of shíshálh Nation. While only four of the original seven remain, three of these are faceless and represent the loss of identity under the Federal Indian Act.

totems - hall commemorative

On October 9, 1986 the federal government passed legislation removing the shíshálhs from the oppressive Indian Act. They became the first in Canada to achieve a self-government status enabling them to exert more control over their economic development . The provincial government would follow 20 months later with legislation creating the Sechelt Indian District Government.

totems - hall

Two larger totems stand to the side of the plaque, each celebrating the passage of this historic legislation by the respective parliamentary body. A second set of totems stand at the front of the hall honouring the elders of the community for their patience and wisdom.

totems - wf3

Sunset Totems

Follow the road leading toward the ocean and turn left, walking along the seawall until you find five totems majestically looking out to the Salish Sea. The  shíshálh territory was vast and these totems represent the four main clans of the nation. The ts ´únay were in Jervis Inlet at Deserted Bay and the xénichen at nearby Queen’s Reach. The téwánkw occupied the waters of Sechelt Inlet and the sxixus ranged from Pender Harbour to Roberts Creek. The fifth totem, in the middle, marks the amalgamation of these four clans in 1925 to form the modern day Sechelt Nation.

totems - wf2

totems - wf1

Leaving the waterfront, walk up Chelphi Avenue until you come to the highway and then turn left, until you reach the traffic light where you can cross the highway. Within just two decades of achieving self-government, the shíshálh Nation had created the Tsain-Ko Village Shopping Centre, the crown jewel of their economic development.  To celebrate this achievement five more totems were erected in 2007.

totems -tsain ko double eagle

The eagle on the top is the Spiritual Bird that watches over all of the communities. Below is the Welcoming figure, holding its arms out in greeting and welcoming people of other nations to the Sechelt Community

tony paul eagle

This Thunderbird is the spiritual guardian of the Sechelt Nation and was carved by band member Tony Paul in 2007.

Three more totems are currently being carved to commemorate the opening of the new wing of the hospital which sits on traditional grounds. The land for the hospital was  generously donated to the community by the shíshálh Nation several decades ago.

Screen Shot 2013-06-13 at 5.18.58 PM

Follow the sidewalk on the north side of the highway and just in front of the hospital you will find artist Andrew U’magalis Puglas and his team at work, skillfully carving to bring out figures of a noble woman, a double headed sea serpent and a great golden eagle from the eight-metre cedar pole.

Cross back over to the other side of the  highway, making one final stop at the House of héwhíwus complex. The tems swiya museum welcomes you to a journey encompassing the shíshálh land, history and culture. Stop by the tsain-ko gift shop and take home a reminder of your visit to Sechelt.

With special thanks to Susan Blockberger, Lenora Joe, Fran Nahanee, Bradley Hunt, Jamie Jeffries, Lori Dixon, Kerry Mahlman, Tony Paul and Candace Campo for helping to compile this information.

Follow this link to return to our website www.coraclecove.com

Posted in Walking Holidays on the Sunshine Coast | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Walking Holidays on the Sunshine Coast – #11 – Hidden Grove & an amazing set of trails to explore just 5 minutes from Coracle Cove

How good is this… a walk through a beautiful forest and a chance to do some photography – sounds like the perfect outing for me!! Hidden Grove is just five minutes from Coracle Cove and I’ve been spending a lot of time there lately.

Google Map for Hidden Grove1

A series of wonderful trails has been created over the past few years and a second, widened trail with a good smooth base has just been finished by the hard working crew of volunteers. Both are perfect for the wheels of your choice – a wheel chair or a child’s stroller - providing increased access to a broader spectrum of users.

There’s a cultural history component to the trail system as well. Shortly after entering the trails you’ll notice several trees which have undergone bark stripping. The shíshálh Nation who have settled the area for several millennia, continue to harvest the bark of the cedar tree to make traditional baskets, regalia and clothing. The bark is relatively thin and grows back quickly.

The history of Hidden Grove is also one of survival… survival from natural fires of several centuries ago, which left charred bark up to a foot thick on the largest Douglas firs. More recently, the area was scheduled for logging but the local community rallied together  and Hidden Grove has been saved again.

Today these precious 125 acres have been set aside solely for recreation and less than 5 minutes away from Coracle Cove, they provide our guests a nearby opportunity for both solitude and a re-connection with nature.

View from Hidden Grove

The main trail rises gently, passing rocky outcrops and mossy plateaus and I branched off to the yellow trail to take this picture. The trail wound its way around a large outcropping of rocks and the view from the top was outstanding. It shows the very narrow stretch of land upon which the town of  Sechelt sits  and how it got it’s first name “Land Between Two Waters.”    We could just make out Vancouver Island in the distance across the Salish Sea

Hidden Groves near Sechelt

The extensive trail system loops through some interesting micro-climates and vegetation. Coming down from Pine Bluff, I picked up the Red Trail and as I followed it further, the change in vegetation was dramatic with a profusion of low growing ferns and moss covered tree trunks.

Hidden Groves near Sechelt

The network of trails is well marked with signs like this at each intersection, and it’s impossible to lose one’s way. Today,  it seemed as if I had the trails completely to myself, with the exception of a a couple of woodpeckers who kept me company with their rhythmic tapping on the trunks of the trees.

Follow this link to return to www.coraclecove.com

Posted in More about our waterfront suite at Coracle Cove, Walking Holidays on the Sunshine Coast | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Bird Watching Holidays on the Sunshine Coast – what are these birds trying to tell us?

The weather’s been crazy lately – freezing temperatures, wild wind storms… oh, and did I mention the rain? Will will it ever end?  Well, there’s a few signals out there, that better weather may be on the horizon.  Nature is pretty good at reading and sending out its own signals. It’s had a lot of practice.  We’re surrounded by quite a few of nature’s creatures at Coracle Cove and when we slow down long enough to watch and listen, we pick up on those signals.

Barrow's Goldeneye at Coracle Cove

Birds migrate over great distances in search of a steady source of food. They have an amazing ability to know just when to start moving on to greener pastures. Like these Goldeneyes who showed up  a couple of weeks ago. There’s just a small flock of maybe a dozen or so, and they like to feed on the mussels under our dock.  They usually hang around for a month before heading further north to begin their breeding cycle.

Surf Scoter at Coracle Cove

This Surf Scoter showed up a couple of days ago. It was a new sighting for me and it wasn’t until I got the binoculars on its colourful beak that I was able to verify its ID.

Hooded Merganzer at Coracle Cove

Mergansers are relatively common throughout our winter months, easily identified by their crested head. My favourite, however, is this Hooded Merganser with a large white crest which he fluffs out to attract a mate. Hooded Mergansers are a sure sign of the approach of Spring and breeding season.

Eagle at Coracle Cove

Although not a migratory bird, Eagles also travel in search of food and salmon is at the top of their shopping list. Our resident family of Eagles return each year after feasting elsewhere on spawning salmon. Their call is easily identifiable and we first started hearing it a few weeks ago. This year’s family seems to be made up of at least one or two adolescents who still have their brown head feathers and this handsome fellow who is the dominant Partiarch of the family.

Oystercatcher at Mission Point

Oystercatchers search along the shoreline for small mollusks and use their long bills to pry the shells open. Like the others in this blog, they return to our area at this time of the year and when I heard that they had arrived I immediately set out with my camera to take some pictures.

Birds are like old friends who have left our lives and then return. In this case, we’re doubly happy to see them because we know that the warmer days of Spring are not too far away.

Follow this link to return to the Coracle Cove website.

Posted in Bird Watching Holidays on the Sunshine Coast | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Walking Holidays on the Sunshine Coast – #10 – Cliff Gilker Park & following the water down to the Salish Sea

Cliff Gilker Park  is zealously protected by a passionate community and with good reason.  Its 56 hectares are joined together with a series of well maintained trails and foot bridges that criss-cross back and forth over Roberts Creek as it funnels its way down to the Salish Sea.

Cliff Gilker Waterfall

Along the way the creek bed drops suddenly in elevation forming four  waterfalls. There are several viewing platforms and comfortable benches allowing one the opportunity to sit and contemplate the beauty of this endless cycle of Nature.

I took the Red trail today, a short 2 km loop which follows along the east side of the creek. The trails are well signed with a map at each intersection. Between stops for pictures and a leisurely pace it took just under an hour. It seemed like I had the park completely to myself as I saw only two other people.

I did have other companions, however, and could hear several species of feathered friends singing their songs of courtship and territory. The ripe salmon berries were a bright orange contrast to the verdant moss covered branches hanging above the misty waterfalls.

The water continued to flow, sometimes quickly, plunging over the rocks, at other times slowly, gathering in pools, but always propelled by the force of gravity. Leaving the park I took a short 5-minute drive to the mouth of Roberts Creek to see the water finally return to the ocean, where it will begin once again the cycle which will bring it back to the highlands behind the creek.

 

Follow this link to return to www.coraclecove.com

Posted in Walking Holidays on the Sunshine Coast | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

My not so secret, favourite Christmas recipe…

Last week I blogged about some of my favourite Christmas traditions -  gathering with a large group of friends and family to walk through the woods in search of the perfect Christmas tree; building a large beach side bonfire to watch the Carol Ships sailing by at night; and best of all, attending a wonderful Winter Harp concert. All of these are annual Christmas traditions that I look forward to at this time of the year.

Christmas is also about food and each year I’m responsible for organizing my Men’s Group to make about 350 rum balls for the Christmas Cookie Sale at our church. These rum balls are an extremely popular item and are likely the reason why line-ups appear well before the doors open.

But I’m getting ahead of myself. Some of the guys in my group barely know how to boil water, so over the years I’ve had to perfect the recipe and simplify the process to ensure that all 350 rum balls are made to the same exacting standards that our door crashing, Christmas cooke sale customers have come to expect.  Herewith, is my not so secret, favourite Christmas recipe…

You only need six ingredients so gather the following together:

  • 2 1/2 cups of Vanilla Wafers (you could also use chocolate or Graham)
  • 1 1/2 cups of walnuts (Martha Stewart likes to toast these for extra flavour)
  • 1 cup of powdered sugar
  • 1/4 cup of cocoa powder
  • 1/2 cup of dark rum
  • 1/4 cup of corn syrup

Dump the first four ingredients into a food processor and whirl it all together until you get a loose crumb.  Pour this into a large bowl and set aside. Add the last two ingredients into a smaller bowl and mix well. Add the wet to the dry mixture and mix until the liquid is completely absorbed and a large dough ball can be formed. Add more rum if you need but only a tablespoon at a time. Refrigerate for half an hour or so. Make yourself a cup of coffee while you’re waiting. You can add a drop or two of rum… just for quality control, mind you.

The size of the rum balls is a matter of individual choice. We usually get 30-40 rum balls from this recipe but church cookie sales are a serious business and we’re not giving them away. Start by dividing the big dough ball into 4 parts – you should get 8-10 balls from each quarter.

Now comes some fun. Pour a little cocoa powder into a cereal bowl and drop in one or two rum balls. Twirl the bowl around and Voilà…  the rum ball is coated with cocoa. You can do this with some powdered sugar as well, or even some ground nuts that you’ve toasted, just like Martha.

Rum Balls mature in flavour with age so start early and store them in a covered container in the refrigerator for at least a few days before serving. I like to wrap them in some cheese cloth that I’ve soaked in a little more rummmmm….

 

Posted in Some of our Favourite Recipes | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Christmas – what’s your favourite tradition?

I love the Christmas season and eagerly anticipate the annual celebration of its rich traditions. This is especially so for the annual Winter Harp performance which comes early to my community. The costumes are a feast for the eyes but it is the contemplative music that leaves me wrapped snugly in the Christmas spirit.

Three beautiful harps, rare medieval instruments and percussion combine to perform an afternoon of festive carols and stories and a most hauntingly beautiful Christmas concert. The ensemble features Kim Robertson, one of the world’s top Celtic harpists and the ever popular narrator Patrick Ball.

Sechelt is the first of their concert series, and many Vancouverites have been known to take the short ferry ride to hear their performance in a more intimate setting. I’ve often been tempted to travel in the other direction to experience their concert in the majestic cathedral of  St. Andrews-Wesley United Church in Vancouver

Watch the video below, a most beautiful rendition of O Come O Come Emmanuel. A singular voice accompanied by the  mesmerizing sound of a 9th century replica Spanish Organistrum and a medieval Bass Psaltery.

Christmas for me is a time to celebrate all these wonderful traditions – the Winter Harp concert, our annual Christmas Tree Brunch with family and friends, a large beach-side bonfire to watch the Carol Ships cruising by at night… it is a magical time to experience and enjoy, and it has begun, once again.

 

Posted in Arts & Culture on the Sunshine Coast, Our Own Traveling Tales | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Fourth Annual Art Crawl coming up soon – October 18-20

How often do you get to visit an internationally acclaimed artist in their own studio and watch them working at their craft? Well, if you take part in this year’s upcoming Sunshine Coast Art Crawl you’ll be in for a very pleasant surprise.  

Last year’s Crawl drew  275 talented artists from 110 studios and galleries who graciously opened their doors for this highly popular annual weekend event. With this much anticipated event less than a month away I’ve decided to re-publish this post from last year’s event.

There were several opening night receptions taking place up and down the Coast and Goldmoss Studio in Roberts Creek was definitely “the place to be.” Fresh from the Coast in Sechelt also attracted a good crowd, offering live music and a demonstration by local artist Brett Varney.

Artist: Brett Varney

Just a few doors down the street, Artworks celebrated their recent relocation to Sechelt with more food and music and a demonstration by contemporary artist Donna Swain. It was a magical experience watching this image emerge on her canvas.

As the evening progressed, a large crowd converged at RockHouse Studio... even the Mayor showed up to help celebrate Art on the Sunshine Coast.  RockHouse, as the name implies features a large granite interior wall which was an intersting counterpoint to the work of impressionist painter Dana Caple Smith.

Sechelt’s Mayor John Henderson with Dana Caple Smith

 

Saturday morning broke with unexpected sunny skies and I was really looking forward to visiting a “best of the best” list of Arts Crawl participants in Roberts Creek that had been recommended to me by one of the organizers. As a long-time Coast resident, I was aware of a number of artists located in this colourful, eclectic community but I was definitly in for a few surprises.

 This is it. Design, a glassworks studio is tucked away deep in the woods of Upper Roberts Creek, and this modernistic studio, filled with treats both inside and out, is now on my official visitors’ must see list.

Further up the road, as I drove deeper into the forest I found yet another hidden jewel, down a roadway behind this interesting street marker.

Andrew Dunkerton came to the Coast in 1975 and has lovingly crafted his beautiful post and beam studio from the trees on his small acreage. Andrew’s love of wood carries on into the studio where he has created beautiful Northwest Coast style masks and bentwood boxes.

My next stop was filled with more surprises. Goldmoss Gallery, with polished concrete floors, high ceilings and tall windows offering magestic ocean vistas beyond would not be out of place in an urbane setting were it not for the majestic tall cedars surrounding the gallery. Goldmoss, which opened in 2010 provides a mix of work by local artists Bon and Lee Roberts as well as others from afar, and their goal is “to provide original fine art to established and emerging collectors.”

Artist: Sally Michener

Sunday brought forth another sunny morning. It was going to be a perfect day for a drive up the Coast to visit a special studio in Halfmoon Bay. But first I wanted to re-visit the studio of Laurie Rolland. Laurie’s small tidy studio in Davis Bay belies her status as an artist whose pottery has been displayed internationally and held in both corporate and public collections, as well as my own.

George Pratt’s studio was the last on my list and I was looking forward to my visit.  Like many artists that I had met this weekend, George was drawn to the Coast as much by its lifestyle as its beauty.  His work is widely collected in North America by private individuals and corporations and several large works have been commissioned for public display in Canada. Some also  have been presentation works for foreign dignitaries including Prince Phillip and Bill Clinton. I was greeted by several of his creations as I walked up his driveway.

His home based studio, set on five acres of rock and trees offers inspiring panoramic views of Welcome Passage and Thormanby Island. More recently, this talented artist has turned to painting and coming inside his studio of vibrant colours was like a fine dessert to end this wonderful weekend.

I’m already looking forward to next year’s Art Crawl. But more importantly I’ve got a great list of galleries and studios that I can re-visit myself and recommend to my B&B guests when they’re looking for intersting places to see on the Sunshine Coast.

Follow this link to return to my website at www.coraclecove.com or to read some of my other recommendations for the Sunshine Coast.

 

Posted in Arts & Culture on the Sunshine Coast | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Walking Holidays on the Sunshine Coast – #9 – Sechelt’s Street Murals

We drive or walk by them every day without thinking,  yet there is an interesting story behind each of the many pieces of art found on the streets of Sechelt. I had the good fortune to take part in a recent tour of downtown Sechelt, led by our Arts Coordinator, Siobhan Smith, and came away with a deeper sense of pride in my community.

Screen Shot 2013-09-20 at 1.25.21 PM

These hydro boxes are a good example and a perfect place to begin. As part of the Sechelt Downtown revitalization plan, in 2008 the District of Sechelt commissioned artist Jan Poynter to decorate the unsightly, graffiti splattered hydro boxes.

The chosen theme was “Driftwood” and each of the three boxes depicts different phases of driftwood on the Sunshine Coast. The smallest of the three, located in front of The Dock on Cowrie Street, is titled Sandpiper Shadows and has a random texture of sandy greys and browns over all.

Screen Shot 2013-09-20 at 1.34.11 PM

Further down the road, on Wharf Street is a larger box featuring the typical rounded “seastone” shoreline, with heavy stumps and driftwood jumbled along below the dark edge of the forest. The pale native beach grass and evergreen salal makes an appearance along with the ever present gulls, crows, an oystercatcher and even a shy black bear peering from the darkness.

Screen Shot 2013-09-20 at 1.34.43 PM

In addition to Sechelt, there are now several painted boxes in other communities, including Gibsons, West Vancouver and the Village of Queen Charlotte.

Image 2

Here’s another example of creating art on a “canvas” that is sometimes the subject of an angry can of spray paint. This mural is one of many by artist, Dean Schutz and can be found on Teredo Street at Inlet Avenue. The Sea Wall was jointly funded by the District of Sechelt and Pharmasave, and was painted during the 2004 Sechelt Family Arts Festival.

Gone Fishing, another very interesting trompe l’oeil painting by Schutz can be found on the wall of the Sechelt Insurance building at the intersectiion of Highway 101 and Wharf and has fooled many a passerby into thinking they may actually be able to rent a room inside.

Image 1

Catch of the Day was painted by Gordon Halloran in 1997 and can be found on the Bank of Montreal building at the east end of Cowrie Street. Halloran is another Sunshine Coast artist with a huge international reputation, making his Olympic debut with a new art form, Paintings Below Zero at the 2006 Winter Olympic Games, and later at the 2010 Olympics in Vancouver when he created Ice Gate, a glacial wall 100′ long by 14′ high.

Catch of the Day, a 1997 Downtown Revitalization project was based upon an old  photograph found in the community archives. Taken in 1912, it shows Captain Patrick O’Kelly standing with members of the Sechelt First Nation on the Sechelt wharf in Trail Bay – all holding their catch of salmon. This particular photograph had been  commissioned by Sechelt pioneer entrepreneur Herbert Whitaker to be displayed at Canada House in England to attract tourists to the Sunshine Coast.

Image 3

Here’s another example of a creative use of wall space that might otherwise become an  target of unsightly graffiti, and in this case it was created by a trio of graffiti artists, but I’m getting ahead of myself.

After viewing Catch of the Day, walk down the alley behind the Bank of Montreal building, about a hundred metres, and you’ll find this impressive wrap-around mural on two sides of the 6 Gill Custom Tattoo building. The mural took about six days to finish and was  done with acrylic spray paint by artists Jordi Ruiz, Nicole Steward and Severino Estevez.

Special thanks again to Siobhan Smith for her research and providing the information that gives meaning to the many pieces of street art in downtown Sechelt. If you’d like to read the first part in this series of Walking Tours of Public Art in Sechelt, follow this link

Follow this link to return to Coracle Cove

Posted in Walking Holidays on the Sunshine Coast | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Walking holidays on the Sunshine Coast – #8 – Sechelt’s Outdoor Sculptures

Tucked in between the Sechelt Library and the Visitor Information Centre, you’ll find a significant collection of public art. Recently, I had an opportunity to learn more about this  collection in a tour of the District of Sechelt Sculpture Garden, led by Siobhan Smith, Sechelt’s Art Coordinator and George Pratt, one of the artists.

Screen Shot 2013-09-16 at 1.28.00 PM

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Summer Time was commissioned by the District of Sechelt and created by local resident George Pratt in 2009. Pratt’s work is widely collected in North America by private individuals, corporations and his giant jade carving, The Emporer’s Sunrise, was a striking focal point at the Canadian Pavillion during the 2008 Olympic Games in China.

Screen Shot 2013-09-16 at 1.27.39 PM

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A sundial was Pratt’s initial idea when proposing Summer Time and he provided a most informative explanation of the workings and challenges of a functioning timepiece which connects the earth and the sun. At our latitude, however, the sun’s rays will stike the sundial for only part of the year… hence, the granite bear on the opposite side, asleep and hibernating, waiting for the sun’s rays to return.

Screen Shot 2013-09-16 at 1.26.49 PM

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Place of Infinite Beauty, Between Two Waters was carved by Michel Beauvais, another  resident of the Sunshine Coast.  Named by the Shishalh, the original inhabitants of the region, the word Sechelt means “land between two waters” and it was from our scenic region that Beauvais drew his inspiration. The polished finish which glistens in the sun is like the ocean waters, while the locally-sourced greenish serpentine stone colours are reminiscent of our Coastal forests.

Image

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Time in its Flight was created by an artist, with deep historical roots to the Sunshine Coast. Anna Hanson’s inspiration comes from her grandfather, the late Dudley Carter who is famous for his monumental wood sculptures, two of which are in Sechelt. Like her grandfather, her material of choice is cedar, as are her tools – an axe, adze and chisel.

Time in its flight reflects the nature, environment and history of the Sunshine Coast. The large copper shield shape is akin to those used in potlatch ceremonies and combines two mediums, traditional western red cedar and contemporary aluminum.

The lower portion portrays simple pictographs, while above are waves and salmon forms in a traditional Coast Salish style. Atop are a fishing boat, sailboat and birds in flight with a stylized bird, perhaps a raven, reaching toward the sky.

Screen Shot 2013-09-16 at 1.26.21 PM

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Across the street from the Library stands a lone totem pole, collectively carved under the leadership of Bradley Hunt. Hunt moved from his ancestral home in Bella Bella to  Sechelt in 1978 where he taught at our local elementary school. He was a much-respected teacher and carved the totem pole in 1985 together with his students and other Shishalh Band members.

This intricately carved totem has two main figures, the eagle and the human. The eagle is a highly significant symbol to the Shishalh people, while the human figure represents the teacher. In the body of this human is a smaller human representing the children. The traditional wealth symbol, the copper appears on this smaller figure – in this case the wealth of knowledge.

Image 4

Just up the street from the school is the Rockwood Centre, home to the very popular, annual Festival of the Written Arts and Sanctuary, by Dudley Carter greets visitors at the entrance to the gardens. Carter first came to the Sunshine Coast in 1927 and when the Great Depression took away his livelihood he turned to art. For the next 60 years he enjoyed a highly prolific and profitable career as a monumental wood sculptor.

As described by his grand daughter, Anna Hansen, Sanctuary speaks to the sacredness of the forest, nature and the environment. Condor, king of the skies is perched on top, while stylized plant forms boldly work their way up the central redwood column. A gentle, nurturing forest maiden stands lightly recessed, protected and enveloped by a concave redwood slab.

Special thanks to Siobhan Smith, Sechelt Arts Coordinator for the use of her notes which were invaluable in preparing this post, and more importantly for her leadership in enhancing and promoting public art in the District of Sechelt. Special thanks also to Tom Pinfold for many of the images in this post.

Follow this link to return to Coracle Cove.

Posted in Walking Holidays on the Sunshine Coast | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment